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tv   The Papers  BBC News  September 10, 2017 9:30am-10:01am BST

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it "a ' “ar thing on fl'.-»1~».«».l-\-» ‘5¢-',-\ w 5.7”? it'5a1‘u15 5 “a 55 u5 37515 5555 55 5555 555 5-55: us first thing on monday but the showery start to the working week. showers heavy and thundery. if you dodge them, you will see some sunshine but it will not feel very warm. 13 to 19 at the very best. a brief lull in proceedings perhaps on tuesday that it will not be long before we see another spell of wet and windy weather which will arrive on tuesday night into the early hours of wednesday morning. this is bbc news. the headlines: hurricane force winds have begun smashing into southern florida as irma approaches. it's expected to make landfall in a matter of hours. more than six million people have been ordered to leave their homes. the storm is moving slowly away from cuba after causing significant damage to the county's north coast. across the caribbean, at least 25 people have died — including five in the british virgin islands. in mexico at least 90 people are now known to have been killed by thursday's 8.1 magnitude earthquake — the strongest the country has seen in a century.
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rohingya muslim rebels in myanmar have declared a unilateral one—month ceasefire, saying they want to ease the humanitarian crisis in the far west of the country. nearly 300,000 rohingya refugees have fled to neighbouring bangladesh to seek shelter. coming up in a few minutes our sunday morning edition of the papers — this mornings reviewers are peter conradi, foreign editor of the sunday times, and rachel cunliffe, comment and features editor at city am. before the papers — sport and for a full round up, let's go to the bbc sport centre. good morning. chris froome is set to win vuelta a espana. he would become the first rider to win that and the tour de france in the same year.
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todayis tour de france in the same year. today is largely a procession into madrid. having finished runner—up on three occasions chris froome has called victory and incredible feeling. it is moments like this now that make all of the sacrifices, all of the time away from home, from family, it's moments like these that makes it all worth it. it's emotional. it is such an incredible feeling. manchester city when the level at the top of the premier league after a ruthless 5—0 win over liverpool yesterday. they sit alongside their city rivals united after they were held to a draw at stoke city in the tea—time kick—off. they had trailed 1-0, but tea—time kick—off. they had trailed 1—0, but goals from marcus rashford and this from romelu lukaku put united 2—1 in front around the hour mark. that did not last long. stoke ended united's perfect start to the
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season. i'm not season. i'm not satisfied with the point. we we re i'm not satisfied with the point. we were the team closer to winning. we we re were the team closer to winning. we were the team closer to winning. we were the team closer to winning. we were the team who tried in the last 20 minutes to win the match. but it isa 20 minutes to win the match. but it is a result i accept. 0ne team tried to win, one team tried to get the point. but they fought hard for that point. august is over. harry kane is back amongst the goals. he scored his 100th for spurs before promptly adding another in their 3—0 win at everton. elsewhere, arsenal beat bournemouth by 3—0. brighton won their first top—flight match for 30 years over west brom. n'golo kante scored against his former side to help
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chelsea to a win. aberdeen missed the chance to go top of the scottish premiership. they we re of the scottish premiership. they were held to a goalless draw by hearts. hearts had the better of the chances at murrayfield but they found joe lewis and the crossbar against them. aberdeen level on points with celtic but behind them on goal difference. elsewhere, motherwell beat kilmarnock for their third league win ina kilmarnock for their third league win in a row. joe root says his players have the opportunity to do something special in the ashes this winter after they wrapped up a 2—1 series win over the west indies. james anderson took seven wickets in the west indies second innings before england come to be chased down 107 for a nine wicket victory at lord's. we have plenty of time now to start planning and thinking more than we have before about the challenges
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which lie ahead. it is a great opportunity for this group of players to do something special don there. if we continue with our approach and attitude we had this summer we will give ourselves a great chance. sloane stephens says she might as well retire now because she does not think she will be able to top her trial at the us open. she thrashed fellow american madison keys in straight sets in the final at flushing meadows to take her first grand slam title. steve and only came back to playing competitively earlier this summer after 11 months out with a foot problem. —— sloane stephens only came back. it is hard to explain. winning a tournament is extremely special. winning the us open, being an american player, is even more incredible. i think it was a big moment for the both of us. it is just insane. there was some british success yesterday at the us open forjamie murray. he and his partner martina hingis claimed the mixed doubles
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title. their second grandson title of the year. they also won at wimbledon. and more good news for the brits. alfie hewett and gordon reid won the wheelchair doubles titles — while andy lapthorne and his american partner david wagner took the wheelchair quad doubles title. the hosts followed up their win at leicester with another impressive victory. saracens lead going into the final four minutes before two tries gave bath the points in what was the head coach's last game in charge. tom collins got the third and final try for the hosts. it means leicester are now second bottom with two defeats from their first two games. went elsewhere for defending champions exeter and harlequins. —— wins elsewhere. scarlets swept aside zebre in their
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match. hull kr will be back in rugby league's super league next season after they sealed promotion with a 12-6 after they sealed promotion with a 12—6 victory over widnes vikings. this long—range try from ryan shawcross enough to secure their return to the top division after a one—year absence. the great city dames climaxes with the great north run today with mo farah on the roads for the first time since his retirement from track racing. —— the great city games. the two time paralympian champion is taking a break from athletics next year. and you may see him also competing in strictly come dancing. coverage of the great north run over on bbc one right now. right now on bbc news, the papers.
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hello and welcome to our look at this morning's papers. with me are peter conradi, foreign editor of the sunday times, and rachel cunliffe, comment and features editor at city am. today's front pages: the devastation wrought on cuba by hurricane irma is marked by the photograph on the observer's front page — it says caribbean residents are begging for help. the paper also headlines research from the local government association which claims some of the poorest families will be £50 a week worse off by the end of the decade. according to the the sunday times, former prime minister tony blair claims that if the government brought in proper immigration controls it would be possible to take back control of the uk's borders without leaving the eu. the mail on sunday headlines news that the independent inquiry into child sex abuse is being widened to examine a separate police inquiry
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which investigated allegations against former prime minister sir edward heath. the sunday telegraph reports that theresa may is considering reducing the interest paid on student loans and ‘strong—arming' universities into lowering tuition fees in an attempt to win back younger voters . sex abuse enquiry to pray edward heath is the main story in the mail on sunday. that is just a flavour, let's kick off. let's talk about hurricane irma. 0bserver, front page, and it is leading our bulletins on how it is leading our bulletins on how it is affecting florida, which it is heading in the next few hours. there has been criticism of the british response. is that reflected in some of the papers' coverage? to some extent, the feeling we should have done more to help these countries because they are our territories. a
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lot of the coverage this morning is just the tales of horror, of people breathing. the newspapers face a problem because when they went to press the main target had not been hit. it was more coverage about people expecting the worst in florida. it already caused a lot of devastation across the caribbean islands. and across cuba. and their are some dramatic photographs in the paper this morning. it is a dramatic, visual story in terms of television. do you think that tra nslates television. do you think that translates to the newspapers? television. do you think that translates to the newspaper57m television. do you think that translates to the newspapers? it is a lwa ys translates to the newspapers? it is always a tricky one for newspapers. it is something the newspapers have the cover because people are watching it on television. the sunday times, for example, we have somebody in florida braced for the arrival. was at the time we went to press. and someone in the caribbean, also. but it is a television story, i think. an important story. affecting huge areas. many british
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territories, in fact. if you look at the map of the size of the hurricane, sort of, transposed over a map of europe, you can see the size. it is a continental sized hurricane. and there is another one immediately to follow. and perhaps a third hitting mexico, as well. it is relentless. in terms of how you can really communicate that in print as opposed to visually, look at the numbers, 7 million people evacuated from florida. about a quarter of the population. 25 people dead already. but you were saying that that is not as bad as it could be. it's interesting that we had this other awful event, the earthquake in mexico, and i'm not sure the latest death toll is through. mexico, and i'm not sure the latest death toll is throughlj mexico, and i'm not sure the latest death toll is through. i think it is about 90. he got a mention on the bulletins. but how do you compare natural disasters around the world? that's the problem. we were talking
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about it earlier, had we had a disaster, or when we have a disaster like this in somewhere like bangladesh, how much coverage does that get? it is a long debate to be had. perhaps not now. on values of different parts of the world. but it is an interesting subject. we only have 15 minutes, so maybe another day. 14 minutes now. chuckles the sunday times. it is your paper, so let's get rachel to talk about it. a story about tony blair. implying he has somehow changed his mind on migrants 13 years after he opened the doors to east european migrants coming. they are not implying it. tony blair has said it. it is on his website. —— there is a blurb from him on the website. this is tony blair trying to get himself back into the debate. it all comes from a place of tony blair does not wa nt from a place of tony blair does not want britain to leave the eu. and... now his argument is if we had better
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control of eu migrants, and if we had had better control in the past, we would not have the leave the eu. of course, the counter argument is, well, this was your fault and your decision. an interesting juxtaposition there. he does actually acknowledge that what he is saying now is very different from what he was saying as prime minister. but not apologising for anything? apologising is a strong words. you can read may be a half acknowledgement that maybe he was not 100% correct between the lines. that is as good as you will get. but he manages to get a criticism of the reason made in there. as home secretary she did not enforce existing rules which already permit the removal of eu migrants if they don't find work after three months in the uk, he has said. ajab at her that we had some controls, which, for whatever reasons, governments did not choose to use. this will
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make everybody on both sides incredibly, incredibly angry. will it make any difference to the brexit debate, do you think?|j it make any difference to the brexit debate, do you think? i don't know. tony blair has calculated the only everybody, i think. unite tony blair has calculated the only everybody, ithink. unite the left and right in hatred of him! exactly. he's holding up belgium as a model, which is odd, because belgium is not often heard as a model. suggesting the belgians make a distinction between people coming withjobs already, or coming to seek work. and saying we could follow that example. this would be some way of squaring the circle. the point he does not make is the fact that in belgium, like in most continental european countries, there is a system of compulsory registration. not just for foreigners, but everyone. to do that you need identity cards. local council, and so on. all of these things that if you impose them in
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britain they will seem to be totally intolerable. parents suing a school over boys in dresses. explain what thatis over boys in dresses. explain what that is about. ridiculous, isn't it? this is a christian family who are threatening legal action against a school because the school has allowed a child in their some's class to wear a dress to school on certain days. they say this discriminates against their desire to raise their child as a christian. —— has allowed a child in their son's dummigan class. —— has allowed a child in their son's class. they have said they don't want to have the conversation about gender and transgender with their child. if we are at a stage where we can sue other parents for pa rental where we can sue other parents for parental actions we disapprove of, i have a long list that starts with...
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allowing parents to take their kids to school in land rovers. i would start there. very controversial. chuckles what is curious is the fact they are threatening legal action because their son's had an issue here, and also their other child had issues, too, and there was another boy being allowed to wear a dress. a lot of that going on. we saw the big vote for labour in the student population and the tories are starting to act upon that. extraordinarily high, i think. we have this bizarre system at the moment. when we shifted from
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one system of student loans to another, the people who had one of those original ones, as rachel does, she pays a lower rate of interest and did not have to pay much for fees to start with. the current wave of students, and i speak as a father of students, and i speak as a father of one, pay a lot and then have this 6.1% interest rate. of one, pay a lot and then have this 6.196 interest rate. at a time of low interest rate it seems extraordinary. if you look at comparisons, the bank of england base rate is no point to 5%. i was looking into this last week. you can get a mortgage for around 2% interest. —— base rate is 0.25%. they also start charging interest from the moment you first take out the loan, which means if you are on a three, formatter year course, you could afford thousand pounds, £6,000 worth of interest before you even graduate. this means looking into. whether this will help the tories
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win over young voters and student voters when they are offering the, sort of comejust voters when they are offering the, sort of come just the interest rate, whereas jeremy corbyn sort of come just the interest rate, whereasjeremy corbyn is offering to slash fees altogether. is he still? that's the problem. he gave the impression in the election he would do that. afterwards they went away and crunched the fingers... figures, rather. chuckles that would be painful! tough party. you could look at this. you could reduce the interest rates. it would seem fairer. but it probably would not make any difference to the finances of the student loan company because very few people will pay them off in full. but it will remove a huge, psychological burden on young people starting university thinking they have these fees afterwards. but i don't think it will get young people to vote conservative. i agree. a foreign story about north korea, britain fearing iran is involved in the
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nuclear programme. all rather extraordinary and alarming. we have known for a long time, or there had beena known for a long time, or there had been a suspicion of uranium involvement, but all —— about also pakistani involvement. it is a speculative piece. a speculative piece in a sunday newspaper! chuckles shocking. it is widely accepted that this could not have been done on their own. where they got help from is unclear. but the timeline of this, it has sped up dramatically, much, much quicker than we expected. also in this article is the un attem pts also in this article is the un atte m pts to also in this article is the un attempts to hunker down on trade. roughly 500,000 tonnes of crude oil to north korea annually from china. if china stopped giving north korea that it would make a huge difference
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in terms of the pressure we could put on the regime. are they likely to do that? that is a significant thing to ask china to do, to cooperate in that way. talking of speeding up, we need to do that, we have a few more papers to get in. 2 million families facing a cut of £50 a week in their income, on the front of the observer. this is based on an analysis. it is a fairly complicated story, which works on various assumptions. the century, looking forward , assumptions. the century, looking forward, it is trying to put together the impact of various benefit cuts, and so on. and saying they will be an average, by 2020, some of the 7 million lowest income households in the uk will face an average of £40 per week loss compared with last year. depressing stuff, really. the sunday express, rachel, we have the eu on the ropes.
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personal attacks on david davis proving brussels' negotiators are losing all of the arguments, according to a senior source. a patriotically page. it is good to see some good news about the eu, whether you believe it or not. a p pa re ntly whether you believe it or not. apparently we are winning in the brexit negotiations. david davis has been emboldened. and every time michel barnier or another eu official criticises britain we should take that as a fact we are winning. i thought were in a negotiation trying to get the best all negotiation trying to get the best a ll cover negotiation trying to get the best all cover both sides, instead of winner takes all and fight to the death. what do you think? who is winning? certainly not the sunday express. they have this quote saying there would be far more concerned if michel barnier and his team were happy with how things are going. talking about making the best out of a bad situation. it is a bit of a
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nonstory. yes. there is this story hereabouts meghan —— here about meghan, maybe we should talk about that. do you think she should marry?|j we should talk about that. do you think she should marry? i would advise that she doesn't. there might be some fringe benefits. chuckles strictly is back. it was back last night, of course. a bit of a debate which has started about whether strictly contestants which has started about whether strictly co ntesta nts ca n da nce which has started about whether strictly contestants can dance with partners of the same sex. the reverend richard coles in this picture, who i interviewed very recently in this studio. is it a goodidea? recently in this studio. is it a good idea? it is in its 14th season.
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maybe the spice things up. do you think it needs modernising?” maybe the spice things up. do you think it needs modernising? i don't see the harm in it. if you are going to get upset about two roman or two women dancing together, there are more things to get upset about, maybe irma destroying large swathes of the caribbean. —— two men or two women. are people getting upset, is it just women. are people getting upset, is itjust an idea of people getting upset? susan calman is upset because she is a lesbian woman but dancing with a man and she has come and a lot of fire on social media for dancing with a man and not dancing with a woman. the more intriguing bit in the story, buried at the end, is whether or not the reverend richard coles will be wearing his dog collar throughout. apparently here not for every dance because some of the routines require him to dance with a spray tan and a bare chest. i hope he was not dressed
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like that when he came here. he was when he was in the communards. you may remember. and he has made the transition. thanks to my guests. just a reminder we take a look at tomorrows front pages every evening at 10.40 here on bbc news. before i take a look at the uk weather here is an update on irma. 0nce weather here is an update on irma. once again it has strengthened to a category four storm and it is still expected to make landfall across the florida keys during midday our time. we are looking at devastating gusts of wind. shoots —— issued
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destruction, lots of heavy rainfall, and a storm surge behind the main impact of the storm which is expected to track up the west coast of florida. for us, an area of low pressure, and circulating around that, plenty of isobars, strong and gusty north—west winds. that will dry in plenty of frequent showers for the rest of the afternoon. some of those showers from northern —— are some of those showers for northern ireland and west scotland will be heavy and it will be disappointing if you are caught in them, 15 degrees at the best. a week weather front producing like showery rainfor weather front producing like showery rain for the spine of the country. it should stay dry during daylight hours in the east anglia and the south—east with 17 or 18 degrees. and a potential improvement across wales and the south—west. that weather front will move through by the end of the day on sunday. we could see gales through the bristol channel during the early hours of monday morning. plenty of showers waiting in the winds to the north
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and west. and that will be the story at the start of our new working week. a windy start to the week. and a showery one. but it won't be too cold, nine to 13 degrees. if you are up cold, nine to 13 degrees. if you are up and off early on monday morning, it is worth bearing in mind that those winds will be a feature. really gusty on exposed coasts. they will dry the showers further in. if you dodge the showers, lucky you, but many showers will be frequent and possibly heavy with hail and thunder. temperatures disappointing that this time of year. and in the tuesdayit that this time of year. and in the tuesday it looks like we we might see a brief respite. not for long, but something quieter, fewer showers around, and again some sunny spells coming through. but there is another speu coming through. but there is another spell of wet and windy weather overnight tuesday into wednesday. it will rattle through at a pace but things still stay pretty unsettled. this is bbc news. i'm ben brown.
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the headlines at 10am. hurricane irma strengthens as it closes in on florida where it is expected to make landfall in a matter of hours. 0ver six million people have been ordered to leave their homes. property is replaceable but lives are not and safety have to come first. don't worry about it. just get out of its way. 0vernight cuba has been battered. there's been significant damage as winds of up to 150 miles per hour hit the country's north coast. this is the bbc havana bureau and i am speaking from inside it because we simply can't go outside any more. at least 25 people have died across the caribbean including five on the british virgin islands wherein major relief effort is getting under way. in mexico at least 90 people are
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